Windows 10 Privacy stuff


#44

Guess whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat
http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2015/11/24/windows-10-automatic-spying-begins-again/


#45

Why the fuck do they do this?


#46

lol windows 10 can fuck off im going back to 7 at least i can disable that shit on there.


#47

Shame I can’t go only linux I hate that games tie me to windows.


#48

Same actually.


#49

Once I do a fresh install again I am going to use win7 as well again. My game performance seem to have become worse.


#50

I just wanna move to linux but I feel like that won’t be easy as I have been using Windows all my life.


#51

Just learn the basics of command line on codeacademy and you are good to go.


#52

I have Linux on another partition but since I broke my fstab I’ve been too lazy to fix it. Also, Razer drivers, expensive music and video software, tons of games… all need Windows. So currently I’m just dealing with Windows. I might try to get some kind of MinGW or Cygwin or something working but I’m just too lazy.


#53

You can play and run a lot of stuff through wine on Linux. For me one of the things that requires Windows is osu!, which is extremely sensitive to any tiny input delay by its nature, and I get a little bit of delay when running it through wine. Although it should be coming to native Linux sometime in the future.


#54

I have Wine (or would have) but it seems kind of limited. Unpacked Portal does work but it’s a bit slow and the mouse seems to escape the window a lot, plus the text glyphs in the console are all garbled. Oh, and the sound has ridiculous latency for some reason. Propellerhead Reason and Sony Vegas also just don’t work in Wine at all, and I paid quite a lot for them.

So yeah, Wine is a thing you can use but I kind of gave up on it. My plan is (or at least was) to eventually dual boot Linux and Windows and switch to the appropriate OS as needed, but as long as I can make do with Windows I’m not sure I’d actually bother with rebooting between the two constantly.

It just sucks that Microsoft still do all this spooky surveillance stuff. :-\


#55

[font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]

[font=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif]


15 years old
$1000 software


#56

Well, if you prefer to believe that I pirated them, fine, but even then I still have them and want to be able to use them. ::slight_smile: Although I only have Vegas 12 Edit and Reason 7, for the exact reason that I can’t afford to upgrade (and don’t really need to).


#57

Well, I made the change.

Considering how win10 is a wierd mixture of windows 8’s half tablet OS and windows 7 and how it tracks the shit out of anything you do/serach/say/install, I don’t have much hope for any future versions of windows, I’ll still use it for games but right now I’m doing most things in Mint 17.


#58

Apparently having tools to “stop” tracking doesn’t have an effect anymore.


#59

What a quality article, lol.

Voat user [...] News Sources: Forbes

That was the voat thread I saw last week some time, which I summarised my thoughts on r/netsec as

I hope he actually does some analysis of the traffic in future rather than just logging connections and speculating over what it is.

Install Glasswire, look at what processes/services are sending data where.

Set up a personal CA and MITM the TLS connections and actually see what data is being sent.

Then maybe there’ll be something interesting.

i.e. I laughed at his “analysis”

Citing Forbes as a source shows how blogspammy the entire post is.

Moving on…

has completed some extensive testing on Windows 10

(FFS this site adds those crappy backlinks to anything you copy, kill me now).

“Extensive”… He learned how to log connections on his router. See my comment above as to what I’d consider to be a starting point for analysis, what has been done is hardly extensive.

where he reports that during an 8-hour period, Windows 10 attempted to send back data from his PC to over 51 different IPS addresses owned by Microsoft, and at a staggering 5500 times.

Hey, actual content from the original source!

After 30 hours, the data being sent back to Microsoft from Windows 10 expanded to a huge 113 non-private IP addresses. These IP addresses being non-private means that hackers can intercept that data, which makes anyone using Windows 10 very, very vulnerable.

“non-private IP addresses” OooOoHhh… What a bunch of FUD.

First-up any sensitive data would be transferred using TLS, and because the guy doing the “analysis” hasn’t yet learned how to look at the traffic he’s logged (Or maybe it was of such little value he intentionally left it out) he hasn’t even figured out what the un-encrypted traffic is. NCSI and Windows updates use HTTP, the UDP traffic is Teredo, I’m sure some of the default start menu tiles also load data (Where else does it get weather and news from?).

The testing was repeated on another Windows 10 clean installation with all of the data tracking options completely disabled, and third-party tool DisableWinTracking was installed, which attempts to shut down all of the hidden Windows 10 data reporting attempts. This didn't help, as at the end of the 30-hour period, Windows 10 had still pushed data to Microsoft 2758 times, across 30 different IP addresses.

Confirmation bias at it’s finest.

“The computer is establishing 2500 less connections, obviously this means Microsoft are still stealing all muh TV shows”


#60

The latest Windows 10 “Creator’s Update” sends the following HUGE amount of data back to microsoft if installed using the Default “full telemetry” option: https://technet.microsoft.com/itpro/windows/configure/basic-level-windows-diagnostic-events-and-fields

and the following amount, not much different, if using the “half” option.
https://technet.microsoft.com/itpro/windows/configure/windows-diagnostic-data


#61

I’m pretty sure the default is basic, not full (Unless you’re on one of the Insider rings). And all of the data in the basic list is pretty sensible stuff for the to collect to be able to understand what things people do/don’t use and how well things work on what devices.

The only invasive stuff would be the browsing/search/typing/speech categories, but during both a clean install and the CU update install you’re given a choice to turn them off (And it’s not hidden away, you can’t actually start the CU install until you’ve selected those options).


#62

I just have an encrypted Veracrypt drive with Whonix where I do my stuff now because I don’t really care in general if NSA is spying on my dick picks.


#63

Okay, a few bits to add on to my last post…

That post and the defaults I mentioned there was written after updating my Surface (Which automatically received the update).

Today I manually updated my main PC using the upgrade tool and that didn’t ask me to set the privacy options before installing, but instead did it after the update, where it did reset most of them to sending data/full diagnostics (I’m pretty sure I had disabled most privacy options on this PC before the update).

Also an aside, Cortana still isn’t enabled on either of my W10 devices, something that can’t seem to be done on any new install without a registry edit.